A delicate balance…

Posted by | February 26, 2015 | Uncategorized | No Comments

I was working on a big project and wanted my husband’s feedback. I didn’t want it to be “another chore” for him but eager to hear his thoughts. I now realize I wasn’t communicating strongly enough, that it was important for him to review and get back to me ASAP. Instead a few days went by until I grabbed his interest and explained that it was important for me to share this and I wanted his full attention. Somewhere along the way I must have given off a vibe of “why the hell do you not care?” to which he answered “I’d love to, it’s not that I’m not interested in what you are working on, I just don’t want to ask and make you feel I’m putting pressure on you”.  Wow, he knows me well! My immediate reaction was that never would I feel that way, but before I spoke I quickly came to realize that yupp, at the wrong moment under stress I may very well have snapped at that very question…

As it typically happens, a thought or experience such as this always trigger thoughts on a subject, so here is a piece on being there for each other in a relationship…

TRUST

The need for closeness and the reactions to being disconnected are a natural part of being human in close relationships, especially in a marital relationship. Couples also long for closeness while protecting their hearts from being hurt and devalued. Spouses cling and cry, get angry and protest, or become withdrawn and detached when actually all they long for is closeness and to be valued.

There are ways couples interact that hurt the bond of their relationship. Pursuing and withdrawing is a common way couples relate that often leaves them far apart from each other. Many couples are stuck in a rigid pursue-withdraw cycle of interacting in an attempt to be seen and understood where one partner pursues and, in response, the other withdraws. The more the pursuer pursues, the further the withdrawer pulls away and shuts down.

In the pursue-withdraw cycle, both partners are unable to share what is going on in their heart; they are only able to share their anger, frustration and hurt.

The pursuer feels the loss of his or her partner’s attention, care, or concern and so searches out him or her with anger, frustration, and hurt. The pursuer feels that if he or she does not pursue, he or she will not be seen or understood. Wives, who are usually the pursuers, often say, “I nag because I feel he will not hear me. He’s just not there emotionally. He can’t shut me out like that.”

The with-drawer, overwhelmed by the pursuer’s emotion, feels alienated and helpless in pleasing his or her partner. And so, in protection, the withdrawer pulls away. Husbands, who are often withdrawers, say they are left feeling devalued, disrespected, and unworthy. Unable to calm and soothe their wife, they withdraw to find peace.

Withdrawers frequently walk on eggshells and skirt around issues that may trigger displeasure in their spouse. Oftentimes withdrawers say that attempting to get their point across is not worth the hassle, because they feel that their spouse would not understand them anyway.

The Impact of the Cycle on Your Marriage Bond: When a spouse is busy pursuing or putting a lot of energy into withdrawing, he or she does not have the emotional space to hold his or her partner’s perspective and needs. Couples begin to see each other as unavailable and inconsiderate. They say of each other, “My husband (or wife) just doesn’t understand me. He (or she) isn’t there for me and no longer cares about how I feel.”

Sharing one’s heart freely begins to feel dangerous. Couples say, “There’s no way my spouse would understand me. I learned not to put my heart out there. Risking that would just mean I’d be hurt again.” When husbands and wives emotionally disconnect, their relationship no longer feels safe or secure. They no longer turn toward each other for support or comfort.

What Triggers Your Pursue-Withdraw Cycle: Something happens, and suddenly you see your spouse in a different light. You perceive your spouse to no longer be the kind, thoughtful, loving person you married but rather the person who does not care about you or value your heart. And although you might not doubt your commitment or your love, you, in the moment, dislike your spouse.

We all have had a time when what our spouse did meant to us that they didn’t care. And when you feel your spouse doesn’t care, or is not there for you, your cycle is usually triggered. Too often differences are interpreted as “You don’t value me.”

When differences are seen as damaging to the relationship, you and your spouse judge one another as being the enemy rather than friends. Most of the time it was the differences that drew you and your spouse together in the first place. You were outgoing and bold, and your spouse was quiet and gentle. After hurts, disappointments, and inability to talk about the complications and difficulties that arise as a result of being different, the differences in your spouse change from positive to negative.

*** A connection comes when you and your spouse are able to sit together and risk talking openly. Don’t let the difficulties that differences bring trigger your rigid cycle of criticism, blame, defensiveness, and withdrawal. It is in this cycle that you and your spouse lose sight of each other’s value. I can’t emphasize this enough! ***

Sharing Heart needs and Longings: As a couple, it is important to talk about the needs, hurts, longings, and feelings of your heart in an open and honest way. In this way you and your spouse can find a path to each other instead of pursuing and withdrawing. Instead of this openness, all too many couples chose the disconnecting path. Or they chose to communicate in ineffective ways.

Expressing your needs and longings to your spouse can be difficult. Some people don’t know what they feel or need. Others feel that if their spouse really loved them, he or she would know what they needed without having to tell them. This expectation is very damaging to the relationship because it keeps your heart’s needs and longings hidden and your pain of being alone heightened. It tempts you to up the ante and angrily pursue your spouse to keep guessing what you need. It also sets up your spouse to withdraw in frustration, because no matter what he or she does, it is just not good enough.

If you are a withdrawer, it will be important for you to share openly and honestly your feelings and needs. Risk being emotionally available to your spouse. It might be important to admit, “I can’t come close to you and be there for you when you are angry and criticizing me.” In this way, you can allow yourself to be there for your spouse in a more open way.

If you are a pursuer, learn to express your heart rather than just getting angry or criticizing. Reach beyond your anger and harsh words to a softer place. From that place, express your longings and fears and ask for your spouse to be there for you. Interactions then won’t revolve around your anger and disappointment. You will both come together around the tender longings of your heart.

Don’t be afraid to admit that sometimes you don’t know what to do. Say something like, “I care for you, but I don’t always know what to say or do.” This invites your spouse to share what they need from you. In this way you are connecting in honesty and warmth instead of anger and defensiveness.

Emotions and Hearts: Couples don’t always know what to do with each other’s emotions. Husbands are taught to buck up and not feel. And wives don’t always know how to express their feelings in a manner that their husbands can hear, understand, and respect. Often spouses fear that their emotions will be found unacceptable or that they will be thought of as weak. How you and your spouse deal with your emotions will be very important to your bond. … So what are you supposed to do with your spouse’s emotions? Try listening.

Listen to your spouse’s emotions with an empathetic attitude. Listen not only with your logic but with your heart as well. I know many of us fall victim to this – our head is working away trying to make sense, pull logic (or no logic) out of a conversation vs JUST listening. I know I am guilty of this at times and need to catch myself!  Aim to understand your spouse’s heart. Listen beyond the words. You don’t always have to find a solution, fix what is wrong, or solve the problem. Often spouses can’t just listen to their partner’s heart without being defensive, reading into the conversation more than what was intended, or being hurt by what is said. Learn to say, “That must have been difficult.” “Sounds like you had a rough day.” “I would be disappointed if that kept happening to me too.”

Both husbands and wives long to be heard, understood, and respected. Most often your spouse comes to you to share his or her heart and life. Listening is the most powerful way to show your spouse that you understand and accept him or her.

Reconnecting Your Hearts: It will be important for you and your spouse to emotionally reconnect as soon as possible after being hurt and hooked into your cycle. Remember, disconnecting and not talking for days or sweeping the whole encounter under the rug and coming back together to take care of household tasks is not a reconnection of hearts, only of schedules. Unresolved hurts and issues add strain and stress to your haven of safety, and soon you and your spouse learn not to turn toward each other but rather away.

HOW SHOULD YOU CONNECT AFTER BEING HURTRemember four things:

• First, Turn your hearts toward each other as soon as you are able. Before the end of the day is preferred. I think we all have heard old couples, married for ages share this “secret”

• Second, come back together and acknowledge what happened. Admit to your role in keeping the cycle going. Remember, your bond is more valuable than your being right.

• Third, share your hurts and needs rather than your anger and frustration. Remember you both value the relationship. Neither wants to hurt or be hurt.

• Fourth, when all is said and done, touch and talk to each other in a soft tone of voice, sharing encouraging words. This can be very powerful. The touch of your spouse is physiologically soothing and calming. It assures both of you that the bond is safe and sure.

When Your Relationship Is a Safe Place: It will be of great value that the emotional attachment bond between you and your spouse becomes close, safe, trustworthy, and predictable. If your marriage is perceived to be a haven of safety, you and your spouse will be a resource for each other and able to withstand the pressures and pains of marriage and life.

But a close attachment bond doesn’t just happen. It is over the course of time and experiences, as each of you interact and respond to each other, that your bond will be nurtured and strengthened. In this way you will experience your relationship as a safe place where your heart can safely be shared and cherished and from this you will find a respect, love and genuine happiness in the relationship.

There is no secret to a happy marriage, no magic but just like anything that is worth it; work and patience pays off!

 

About Inspiring Result

I am a thought leader who want to live in a world where people feel excited about doing what they choose to do, fulfilled and in a place where there is room to reach the level of success desired; enjoy laughter, loved ones and fulfilling conversations. I am a Success Coach, with close to two decades of experience with a background in traditional counseling, Sport Psychology and a degree in Strategic Interventions from Robbins-Madenas Training Center. I've been applauded for my straight forward, warm approach working with a range of clients from many high profile regulars, organizations to the 'girl next door'. When I'm not immersed in my coaching world I can be found on adventure with my family, in the barn with our horses or burying my toes in the sand. Integrating what I believe in every single area of my life, I do not try to balance the mythical scales so that work and family demands and rewards are exactly even. Rather, I trying to understand this: Accurately assessing the nature of [one's] own personalities, sense of self-identity, and the degree of control over work and family lives is crucial to finding satisfaction. Balance is not the goal, a healthy prioritized integration is. My work has been a warm welcome into many busy lives and is offered as a structured one on one program, workshops and educational sessions on a consulting basis, talking about how to successfully identify and reach goals by strategically gaining clarity. Currently I'm passionately working on integrating generations in today's workforce; creating a business culture where talent is retained and can thrive, not only Millennial talent but all talent throughout the organization! As your strategist, I am driven by your results and your success!

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